Home
Home
RSS
RSS
Change Font Size
Font
Print
Print

Information on Civil Disabilities

 
 

In Ohio, a state or federal felon loses the rights to hold an office of honor, trust, or profit, and to serve on a jury until granted supervised release or parole. During any period of incarceration, they also lose the right to vote. Public servants convicted of a bribery or theft in office offense, are prohibited from ever holding any public office, employment or position of trust. A public servant convicted of soliciting or receiving improper compensation is disqualified from holding any public office, employment or position of trust in the State of Ohio for seven (7) years from the date of conviction.

 

In general, a felony conviction may be a bar to obtaining or maintaining a professional or occupational license. Ohio has adopted a registration requirement for persons convicted of sexually oriented offenses. Several cities require felony registration; see your officer for details on issues of licensing and registration.

 

In that a felon's right to vote is only suspended during incarceration, they are qualified to vote during any period of probation, parole or supervised release, and are encouraged to do so. In some counties, the Board of Elections revokes voting privileges upon notice of a conviction; thus, offenders should contact the Board of Elections to reinstate voter registration when eligible. If needed, offenders can obtain a Voter Registration Form here.