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Supervision

 
 

Officers supervise defendants released to the community until they begin to serve their sentence, the charges are dismissed, or they are acquitted. Generally, the officers' supervision responsibilities are to: 1) monitor defendants' compliance with their release conditions; 2) manage risk; 3) provide necessary services as ordered by the Court, such as drug treatment; and 4) inform the Court and the Assistant U.S. Attorney if the defendant violates the conditions.

 

When the officer receives a case for supervision, the officer reviews the information about the defendant, assessing any potential risk the defendant presents and any supervision issues that may affect the defendant's ability to comply with the release conditions. The officer selects appropriate supervision strategies and develops a supervision plan, which the officer modifies if the defendant's circumstances change.

 

The officer carries out risk management activities to help ensure the defendant complies with the release conditions, as the examples in the chart here shows. Among the officer's routine supervision tasks are monitoring the defendant through personal contacts and phone calls with the defendant and others, including family members, employers, and treatment providers; meeting with the defendant in the pretrial services office and at the defendant's home and job; helping the defendant find employment; and helping the defendant find medical, legal, or social services. Also, some officers, for instance, drug and alcohol treatment specialists or home confinement specialists--perform special supervision duties which require certain skills or expertise.

 

If the release conditions become unnecessary, the officer asks the Court to remove them. If the defendant violates the release conditions, the officer notifies the Court and the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Depending on the circumstances, the officer may recommend that the Court conduct a hearing to decide whether to modify the release conditions, revoke the defendant's bail, issue a bench warrant, or order the defendant detained.